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Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic (long-lasting) disease. It develops when a person’s immune system sends faulty signals that tell skin cells to grow too quickly. New skin cells form in days rather than weeks.

The body does not shed these excess skin cells. The skin cells pile up on the surface of the skin, causing patches of psoriasis to appear. 
Psoriasis may look contagious, but it's not.

You cannot get psoriasis from touching someone who has it. To get psoriasis, a person must inherit the genes that cause it.

ESSENTIAL FACTS

Take good care of yourself

Eating a healthy diet, exercising, not smoking, and drinking very little alcohol will help. Smoking, drinking, and being overweight make psoriasis worse. These also can make treatment less effective. People who have psoriasis also have an increased risk for developing heart disease, diabetes, and other diseases, so taking good care of yourself is essential.

Be aware of your joints

If your joints feel stiff and sore, especially when you wake up, see a dermatologist. Stiff or sore joints can be the first sign of psoriatic arthritis. About 10% to 30% of people who have psoriasis get this type of arthritis. 
 

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